GloucesterTimes.com, Gloucester, MA

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September 20, 2013

Colorado flooding triggers oil spills, well shutdowns

DENVER (AP) — Colorado’s flooding shut down hundreds of natural gas and oil wells in the state’s main petroleum-producing region and triggered at least two spills, temporarily suspending a multibillion-dollar drilling frenzy and sending inspectors into the field to gauge the extent of pollution.

Besides the possible environmental impact, flood damage to roads, railroads and other infrastructure will affect the region’s energy production for months to come. And analysts warn that images of flooded wellheads from the booming Wattenberg Field will increase public pressure to impose restrictions on drilling techniques such as fracking.

“There’s been massive amounts of growth in the last two years, and it’s certainly expected to continue,” Caitlyn McCrimmon, a senior research associate for Calgary-based energy consultant ITG Investment Research, said of Colorado oil and gas drilling. “The only real impediment to growth in this area would be if this gives enough ammunition to environmentalists to rally support for fracking bans, which they had started working on before this.”

Two spills were reported by Anadarko Petroleum Corp. — 323 barrels (13,500 gallons) along the St. Vrain River near Platteville, and 125 barrels (5,250 gallons) into the South Platte River near Milliken, federal and state regulators said. The St. Vrain feeds into the South Platte, which flows across Colorado’s plains and into Nebraska.

In both cases, the oil apparently was swept away by floodwaters. Both releases involved condensate, a mixture of oil and water, Environmental Protection Agency spokesman Matthew Allen said.

The environmental damage still was being assessed, but officials in Weld County, where the spills took place, said the oil was among a host of contaminants caught up in floodwaters washing through communities along the Rocky Mountain foothills. County spokeswoman Jennifer Finch said the major concern there is raw sewage.

Gov. John Hickenlooper said late Thursday there is a lot of water to dilute pollutants, including oil, in the South Platte.

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