GloucesterTimes.com, Gloucester, MA

Fishing Industry Stories

February 25, 2013

NOAA eases monkfish limits as 'alternative'

NOAA Fisheries has announced proposed measures that would loosen controls in the Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank on monkfish, which is seen as a lucrative alternative to groundfish and is often caught by Gloucester groundfishermen and other New England grondfishermen.

The proposed “temporary emergency action “ would suspend existing monkfish possession limits for vessels issued both a groundfishing permit and carrying a days at sea monkfishing permit. The proposed action, published in the Federal Register, would last at least 180 days, but could be extended if the total allowable landings are not surpassed.

The expansion of the total allowable size of the landings in monkfish from the waters east of New England to the transboundary line in Georges Bank that separates Canadian from American waters is 271 tons. With 2013 total landings allowed in the area set at 5,854 metric tons, the liberalization would represent a 4.6 percent increase.

NOAA projected revenues from the increase of between $661,000 and $1.9 million. The vast majority of monkfish caught in the waters of the Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank is landed in Gloucester and New Bedford; monkfish tails are high priced and taste somewhat like lobster.

The easing of monkfish regulatory mandates, however, comes as the Northeast groundfishery is facing dramatic cuts in limits for the landing of Gulf of Maine cod and Georges Bank cod — two of the New England fishery’s iconic harvesting catches — for the 2013 fishing year that begins May 1.

Despite challenges by the Gloucester-based Northeast Seafood Coalition, the New England Fishery anagement Council and a number of federal lawmakers from across New England and New York, NOAA Notheast Regional Administrator John Bullard has stuck to his stand that NOAA cannot, under the Magnuson-Stevens Act, extend the current interim 22 percent cut in Gulf of Maine cod catch for a second year, so more dire cuts of up to 77 percent are being allowed to take hold — cuts that, given the likelihood of cod hailed up in bycatch from other stocks, will prevent boats from targeting any cod at all, many fishermen and officials believe.

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