GloucesterTimes.com, Gloucester, MA

Fishing Industry Stories

March 5, 2013

Study targets fishing gear for bluefin fishermen

A research scientist at Nova Southeastern University Oceanographic Center in Miami is in the homestretch of a pilot study showing that substituting two types of fishing gear for pelagic long-lines might eliminate the bycatch of severely overfished bluefin tuna in their northern Gulf of Mexico spawning grounds.

The findings could have implications for fishermen who catch tuna in the Gulf of Maine. The University of Massachusetts’ Large Pelagics Research Center, located in Hodgkins Cove and headed by Gloucester resident Molly Lutcavage, is tracking bluefin tuna migrations between the two gulfs.

The preliminary findings of David Kerstetter and several graduate students are seen as important because bluefins are among the world’s priciest and most exploited fish.

The northern Gulf of Mexico is one of a few spots where bluefins are known to reproduce, and many are caught accidentally by commercial long-line fishermen targeting yellowfin tuna and swordfish. To make matters worse, the 2010 BP oil spill might have taken out large numbers of bluefin larvae because it occurred in the middle of the spawning season, scientists have said.

Atlantic bluefin fishing is almost entirely limited to hook and harpoon — much of it based off Gloucester, as chronicled in the National Geographic channel’s Gloucester-based reality show, “Wicked Tuna.”

Kerstetter, who has extensive experience with the commercial buoy gear fishery for swordfish in southeast Florida, wanted to find out whether substituting that equipment — as well as commercial “greenstick” gear — for miles of baited surface hooks in the Gulf would result in less bycatch of bluefins and other species such as sea turtles and billfish. So, for the past year, he and several graduate students have been working with four commercial fishing boats to switch from long-lines in the Gulf.

Buoy gear consists of a floating, lit-up marker attached to a mainline with one or two branch lines, each with a baited hook. When a fish strikes, it pulls the buoy across the surface, alerting the fishermen to retrieve it. Greenstick gear consists of a pole mounted amidships trolling a mainline behind the boat that holds five to 10 “drop lines” baited with plastic squid that skip across the surface. When a fish bites the baits, the mainline breaks away from the greenstick and is retrieved by a hydraulic winch. Both systems are tended immediately when a fish hits, while pelagic long-lines have up to 40 miles of baited hooks dangling just beneath the surface that might not be hauled back until long after hooked fish or other species are dead.

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