GloucesterTimes.com, Gloucester, MA

Fishing Industry Stories

December 10, 2013

RI backs Bay State fishing suit

AG files brief opposing 'devastating' NOAA regs

Rhode Island is looking to help two of its New England coastal neighbors in the lawsuit to force the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to reverse regulations that have resulted in stinging cuts in groundfish catch limits and order the federal agency to better consider the economic impact of its regulations on fishing communities.

Rhode Island filed an amicus brief in U.S. District Court in Boston last week in support of the suit initially filed in May by Massachusetts and joined by New Hampshire in September.

The brief, while setting out material differences between Rhode Island’s fisheries and those of Massachusetts and New Hampshire, supports the view that the regulations will continue to devastate Massachusetts commercial fishermen “and most certainly will ensure that commercial fishing will no longer be the core of the Commonwealth’s economy or communities.”

The concern, according to the brief, is that the current NOAA regulations could set off a chain reaction that would result in “a fisheries management plan that may have a substantial adverse impact on the conservation and enforcement programs that Rhode Island provides and supports.”

“The next time, it could be us,” said Amy Kempe, spokeswoman for Rhode Island Attorney General Peter Kilmartin. “Rhode Island clearly recognizes that NOAA needs to do a better job of determining the economic impact of its regulations.”

The filing of the amicus brief does not mean Rhode Island has joined the lawsuit as a plaintiff.

Kempe said the Ocean State determined the amicus brief was the appropriate action due to the differences between its fisheries and its two coastal neighbors to the north.

“We have slightly different marine resources and fisheries,” she said. “The regulations would have a different impact on Rhode Island because of the groundfish it targets. Basically, we share the same water, but slightly different fish.”

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