GloucesterTimes.com, Gloucester, MA

February 1, 2013

Letter: The difference between gun rights and gun laws


Gloucester Daily Times

---- — To the editor:

This is an open letter to President Obama.

Dear Mr. President,

This is in reference to plans to reduce gun violence in the wake of the tragic shooting in Connecticut on the state and federal level, as well as the president invoking executive orders.

I believe these laws and executive orders that you are proposing are unconstitutional in the extreme and can only be a misinterpretation of the Second Amendment.

There are laws, and then there are rights. Laws are passed, due in large part, to the current take on morality. Rights, as enumerated in the Bill of Rights, are ageless. It does not take an intelligent person to read the Bill of Rights and realize that they transcend moral behavior.

Our Founding Fathers realized that moral behavior, current trends and future misgivings may very well change the face of law in this country. Rights, however, should never change.

Our Founding Fathers knew this. The Bill of Rights was written so that no matter the time, their importance would remain resolute. These rights are inalienable.

When it comes to a point that we allow our politicians to decide which of our rights are important and which are not, we risk the freedoms of our children. It is our children who will suffer this folly.

People can kill people by whatever means they have at their disposal. Firearms laws simply remove the law-abiding citizens’ ability to defend themselves, not the criminals’.

I invoke my Second Amendment right to arm myself with the most effective firearms currently available if for no reason other than to guarantee my children’s future. I will leave their future freedoms in no one’s hands but my own.

Let there be no mistake about the mindset of the people who drafted and signed the Bill of Rights and the U.S. Constitution:

“No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms. The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.” — Thomas Jefferson.

“The atmosphere of firearms anywhere and everywhere restrains evil interference — they deserve a place of honor with all that’s good.” — George Washington.

“The best we can hope for concerning the people at large is that they be properly armed.” — Alexander Hamilton.

JOSEPH CARBONE

Peabody