GloucesterTimes.com, Gloucester, MA

Opinion

October 2, 2013

Letter: Government calamity and the common good

To the editor:

There is a paper titled “The Tragedy Of The Commons” that presents the idea that an area held and used in common for mutual benefit can survive only if no one violates the integrity of the commonwealth.

If one person violates the agreement, others might join in and that will ruin the

benefit to all. What is not emphasized is that holding the violator responsible and punishing that person can slow or stop further violations.

Some banks, realtors, insurance agencies, and customers violated a working system of selling and buying mortgages with all parties insured. Few of the violators have been punished and their “sharp” business practices continue.

Marine fishing companies could have worked cooperatively with support from multiple nations and advice from trustworthy sources. That option didn’t seem attractive enough to some participants. Violations continue while honorable people see diminishing returns because they abided by the regulations imposed upon them.

Politicians who are immune to election challenges vote to deprive their constituents of affordable health care. They oppose financial support for education to help them compete in a world where job applicants can come from any country.

They ignore crumbling roads, bridges, and public use buildings. They prattle about their moral view of the world yet deny any validity to opposing views. They say they are merely denying sluggards any indulgence. They pontificate how others must sacrifice for the moment but make none themselves.

If you still read, listen to what some House and Senate Republicans are saying but listen to them from neutral sources. They do exist. With Oct. 1 behind us, ask yourself a few awkward questions. Will non-existent funds be sent from Medicare or Social Security to your bank? Electronic transfers also require real people to do things. If they are on “leave” where does that “leave” you?

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