GloucesterTimes.com, Gloucester, MA

Top Stories

June 28, 2013

Still no answers on Essex Aggie hiccups cases

DANVERS — State health officials continue to quietly investigate what may have caused one to two dozen students to exhibit unexplained vocal tics or repetitive hiccups at Essex Agricultural and Technical School in Danvers, and to a lesser extent, North Shore Technical High in Middleton, this past school year.

The state is reaching out to more than 2,600 doctors in the region while investigating environmental factors that may have caused the symptoms, including air testing and visual observations inside school buildings. So far, according to a May 10 status report from the state Department of Public Health, air tests did not turn up anything that would contribute to “significant neurological effects.”

Danvers Health Director Peter Mirandi, in an update to the Board of Health on May 30, said the state is casting a wide net to gather information from doctors and their patients.

“They will be looking for correlations between the symptoms and the students,” Mirandi said. “The effort from the Department of Public Health is very thoughtful, deliberate and I wouldn’t mind recognizing them for stepping up when we needed assistance.”

The wide net is necessary because Essex Aggie is an independent, state-owned agricultural and technical school of 479 students which provides transportation for students living within a 20-mile radius of its Hathorne campus along Route 62.

North Shore Technical High in Middleton, which has 475 students, reportedly had a handful of cases. It draws students from 16 communities on the North Shore, and both schools include students from Gloucester and Cape Ann’s towns of Rockport, Manchester and Essex.

A spokesman for the state Department of Public Health had no update on the investigation.

”It’s a very extensive process and there is no report that I have,” said Ann Roach, media relations manager for the state Department of Public Health.

Joy White, the director/principal for Essex Aggie, referred all comments to the Department of Public Health, but did provide two status updates from the department, one from February and one from May, both of which were distributed to parents, she said. The updates outline efforts of the Department of Public Health’s Bureau of Environmental Health to investigate the symptoms at both schools, which primarily occurred last November and December.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Top Stories

Pictures of the Week
Your news, your way
AP Video
Raw: IDF Footage Said to Show Airstrikes Police: Ferguson More Peaceful Raw: Aftermath of Airstrike in Gaza Raw: Thousands March on Pakistani Parliament Raw: World's Oldest Man Lives in Japan Fire Crews Tame Yosemite Fire Raw: Police Weapon Drawn Near Protesters, Media Raw: Deadly Landslides in Japan Raw: Explosions in Gaza As Airstrikes Resume Arrests Witnessed in Ferguson Charter Schools Alter Post-Katrina Landscape Texas Gov. Perry: Indictment 'a Political Act' US Officials: Video Shows American's Beheading Video Shows Ferguson Cop Months Before Shooting Heavy Rains Flood Arizona Roads US Trying to Verify Video of American's Killing FBI Director Addresses Ferguson Shooting in Utah Raw: Police at Scene of St. Louis Shooting Police: 2 Calif. Boys Planned School Shooting NOLA Police Chief Retires Amid Violent Crimes