GloucesterTimes.com, Gloucester, MA

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August 26, 2013

City, Endicott firm up GHS course deal

When Gloucester High School students starting the 10th grade return to class next week, they’ll not only be stepping into their sophomore year at GHS.

They’ll have the chance to get a big leg up on their first year in college as well.

An agreement formally signed last week among Gloucester Superintendent of Schools Richard Safier, Mayor Carolyn Kirk, and Endicott College President Richard E. Wylie has firmed up a program under which GHS students can earn up to 15 Endicott College credits while adding to their high school credits as well.

The program will require the high school sophomores to commit to a three-year program of college courses, beginning with this year’s Endicott Liberal Studies course titled “Seminar in Academic Inquiry” to be taught by a Gloucester High instructor in cooperation with a supervising Endicott professor.

That program would be followed during the student’s junior and senior high school years by a two-class course of study in 11th grade, with a Humanities-based program to include a college writing seminar and a modern history course.

A similar two-class course of study for the student’s senior year of high school will “likely include” a social science course and an Oceanography course, according to the high school’s program guide.

In each course, the participating student will earn 5 high school credits and 3 Endicott College credits, meaning the students will have the chance to ring up 10 high school credits and 6 for Endicott during the two years of two courses each.

The tuition rate for the college credit courses is set at $225 for reach three-credit course, meaning that the students can earn 15 Endicott College credits for less than $1,200 while still in high school, officials noted.

School officials said they will be seeking a new “cohort” of students each year for the program, beginning this fall, with enrollment limited to 20-25 10th graders beginning each year. And some two dozen students have enrolled for this fall, school officials said.

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