FishOn: Shows we'd like to see at Annisquam Village Hall

File photo/The New England Fishery Management Council's fishing season schedule, bag limits and minimum size for the upcoming 2021 recreational fishing season for Gulf of Maine cod and Gulf of Maine haddock is the same as last year. 

 We here at FishOn once had a friend who had life boiled down to five simple maxims. Our favorite: "Never read a book that weighs more than your head."

He had a tiny head, so he didn't get much reading done. But he loved the theater.

Speaking of treading the boards, the Annisquam Village Players are holding a fundraiser Saturday night to help with the restoration of the Annisquam Village Hall roof.

It's a virtual fundraiser. Yet they're asking for real money. This is the new business model for the next millennia.

The 7 p.m. event, which you may access on the night of the show with a live link available on the AVP website (AnnisquamVillagePlayers.org) will feature the "Raze" the Roof Cabaret, zooming various acts straight into your own homes, where hopefully your roof is in fine shape. All proceeds will go to the hall's roof reconstruction fund.

The suggested donation is $20. Dig a little deeper and you become a sponsor, which affords you access to the VIP Champagne Lounge. Of course, it'll be in your own home, so you better get busy.

Eave status will run you $50 and $100 earns Soffit status. Cupola status (we are in the presence of marketing brilliance here) tops it out at $250. We did not make up those names.

So, it's a good cause and you've been dying to break into your crypto-currency piggy bank. So, pony up.

We here at FishOn are sure the cabaret will be boffo. But if it were us, we would have gone with a fish-theme for the show. Here are four productions we'd love to see the AVP do:

"Kiss Me, Hake" — Small-mesh love in the time of the pandemic.

"Le Cage aux Fish" —We laughed until we couldn't breathe. And we were underwater.

"Pogie and Bess" — The bait is worth the wait.

"Finian's Rainbow Trout" — A fine cast! A better reel!!

Gulf of Maine recreational cod and haddock measures? Ibid

The New England Fishery Management Council has set the fishing season schedule, bag limits and minimum size for the upcoming 2021 recreational fishing season for Gulf of Maine cod and Gulf of Maine haddock. They should look familiar. They are the same as last year.

In case you've just tried to airbrush all thoughts of 2020 from your cerebrum, allow us to reconnect the dots:

For GOM cod: The private open season is set for Sept. 15 to 30. The bag limit is one fish per day, per angler and the minimum size is 21 inches. The party/charter for-hire seasons are Sept 8 to Oct. 7 and April 1 to 14, 2022, with the same bag limit of one fish per day, per angler and same minimum size of 21 inches.

For GOM haddock: The open season will run May 1, 2021 to Feb. 28, 2022, as well as all of April 2022. The month of March 2022 will be the only period closed to recreational haddock fishing in the Gulf of Maine. The bag limit is 15 fish per day, per angler. The minimum size is 17 inches.

The recommendations still must pass muster with NOAA Fisheries.

"These are the same measures that (the Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office) implemented on August 13, 2020 during the pandemic to provide additional fishing opportunities for cod and more access to the abundant haddock resource at a time when the recreational fishing community, especially the for-hire fleet, was greatly impacted by the pandemic," the council stated. "In selecting those measures, GARFO considered the Council’s June 2020 request to expand the fall fishing window to help recreational fishermen make up for lost access to the springtime fishery."

FishOn baseball quiz question

On this date in 1936, 48-year-old Walter Johnson, nine years into retirement after his Hall of Fame pitching career with the Senators, threw a silver dollar across the Rappahannock River in Virginia as part of Washington, D.C.'s 150th anniversary celebration. The toss was estimated at 386 feet, but just a little bit outside.

The Big Train played his final game on Sept. 30, 1927, against the Yankees in New York. What else made that game notable?

The telephone is ringing. They told us it was Chairman Mao

Now that would be something seeing how the Big Fella has been dead for coming up on half a century. So, no Mao. But it could be someone from the University of Florida calling on behalf of NOAA Fisheries.

NOAA Fisheries and the Gators are in the midst of conducting a telephone survey to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on commercial and for-hire fishing operations, as well as seafood dealers and processors.

"This survey will assist us in assessing economic impacts on individual businesses over the entire 2020 calendar year," NOAA Fisheries stated. "It is a followup to a survey conducted during July/August 2020 on impacts for the first half of the year."

Allow us to summarize those first-half impacts: Really, really not at all good.

So, if a 352 area code pops up on your phone, it just might be some overworked and undercompensated grad student looking for your help on the survey. Organizers promise the calls should take no longer than 10 minutes and all information imparted will remain hush-hush and on the QT.

Watershed moments

Word from quasi-reliable sources has reached us here at FishOn that children are our future. And a good thing, that. Just look at how the adults have handled the present.

So, let's get the kids more involved. Here's a way: Hide their phones.

Here's another way:

NOAA has opened the funding competition for its Bay Watershed Education and Training program. B-WET to the initiated. The program funds "locally relevant, authentic experimental learning" for kindergartners through 12th-graders through Meaningful Watershed Educational Experiences.

The MWEEs are described as "multi-stage activities that include learning both outdoors and in the classroom."

The goal of the program is to increase familiarity and stewardship of watersheds and related ocean, coastal areas, rivers and estuaries. It also includes the Great Lakes ecosystem, but we don't have to worry about that here.

"New England B-WET focuses on the priorities and challenges facing New England watersheds by helping students and teachers apply scientific methods and tools to understand and appreciate their local watershed system," NOAA stated. "B-WET encourages students to become more interested in science, technology, engineering and math. By focusing on watersheds where they live, and by participating in personally relevant stewardship projects, students and teachers can become knowledgeable stewards of their local environment."

You can find more information about the program, its goals and priorities at NOAA Fisheries' website, fisheries.noaa.gov.

FishOn baseball quiz answer

In the bottom of the eighth of a 2-2 game, Babe Ruth launched his 60th home run of the '27 season to set a single-season home run record that would stand for 34 years.

Johnson, whose 417 career pitching wins is second only to Cy Young's 511, did not pitch that day. His last moment came as a pinch hitter, flying out to right field off Herb Pennock to end the game and his 21-year career.

As always, no fish were harmed in the making of this column.

Contact Sean Horgan at 978-675-2714, or shorgan@gloucestertimes.com. Follow him on Twitter at @SeanGDT

Trending Video

Recommended for you