Baker argues for federal aggression in opioid fight  

Sam Doran/SHNS/Gov. Charlie Baker, a member of President Donald Trump's opioid commission, said Thursday he’d like to see the federal government amp up efforts in the fight against opioid addiction.

BOSTON — Gov. Charlie Baker on Thursday laid out a series of areas where he’d like to see the federal government get more "aggressive" in the fight against opioid addiction.

"I would love to see the feds get very aggressive about education," Baker said at a Washington Post Live event at the Hyatt Regency Boston.

Safe prescribing and pain management practices could be incorporated into medical schools and continuing education nationally, modeled after the approach at schools in Massachusetts, he said.

A member of President Donald Trump’s opioid commission, Baker said he’d also like to see the federal government amp up efforts around recovery coaches — a treatment approach he said Massachusetts is trying to figure out how to "embed" into the health care system.

An opioid bill Baker filed last November aims to "create sort of a structured program around recovery coaching," he said Thursday.

An ongoing recovery coach pilot program has yielded encouraging preliminary results, Baker said.

"We have seen some significant positive developments in those interactions, translating into people moving into treatment," he said. "And now the key is we have to figure out how to get them to stay in treatment."